Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘great books for kids’

We have loved our books again this week!  I am also pleased because I have probably had over sixty items checked out from the library over the last three weeks, and so far only one late fee :).  Here is a sampling of our week in books:

If You Lived In Colonial Times by Ann McGovern – This series  of books by Ann McGovern always grabs my kids’ attention.  She poses several questions, such as, “What were the schools like?”, “Were there doctors in colonial days?”, and “How did people get the news?”  She poses fifty-two questions in this book alone, and the answers are fascinating.  A great way to learn more about the everyday life and questions kids want the answers to about different time periods.

Skunks Do More Than Stink by D. M. Souza – Boy, there has been a lot of talk about skunks around here this week inspired by this book.  Wow – so much I never knew!  This book even manages to help you develop a little soft spot for these smelly guys (and gals). 

The Beetle Alphabet Book  by Jerry Pallotta – Pretty much exactly what you would expect from the title – a book about 26 different types of beetles!  Did you know that there are over a million different species of beetles?! God’s creation is amazing.  There are interesting facts about each beetle, beetles in general, and how to distinguish beetles from other insects.

Play and Learn French and Play and Learn Spanish by Ana Lomba and Marcela Summerville – We are just not ready to plunk down hundreds of dollars on Rosetta Stone at this point.  However, I do want our kids exposed to the sounds and vocabulary of both French and Spanish.  French is Jason’s parents’ native language, which is why we are choosing this language.  Each book comes with an accompanying audio CD with a native speaker reading or singing each lesson.  The situations are simple and familiar, and the occasional catchy tunes are very entertaining.  It is enough to expose them, for now, and also very inexpensive.  Bonus.

What books are you enjoying with your kids this week?

Read Full Post »

Cover of "Roxaboxen"

Cover of Roxaboxen

The mornings this past week were cool enough to prompt us to relight our fireplace.  We love our fireplace.  That little guy can heat our entire house, and keep things quite toasty through some ugly Chicago winters.

It is definitely a cool weather ritual around here for the first person downstairs in the morning to flip on the fireplace.  And, it is another ritual for the kids and I to push the couch in front of the fireplace (gotta love hardwood floors and felt), snuggle up and read.  I am so blessed.

Here is what we are snuggling up with this week:

Roxaboxen by Alice McLerran, Illustrated by Barbara Cooney – Another sweet book illustrated by Barbara Cooney.  This one is the story of a city made of rocks on a hill and inhabited by an imaginative group of neighborhood children. Some treasures of childhood are buried in your heart and carried carefully into adulthood – Roxaboxen is one.

Verdi by Janell Cannon – Verdi is an adventurous little yellow python who has no interest in growing up and turning green.  Despite his wishes, and without him noticing, he matures into a lovely green grown-up who still appreciates the energy and excitement of youth.

Dear Garbage Man by Gene Zion, Illustrated by Margaret Bloy Graham – Originally written in 1957, an environmentalist book this is not.  However, it is an amusing tale about the first day on the job for a garbage man.  He makes trash into treasure, only to find it was really just trash all along!

A Lion to Guard Us by Clyde Robert Bulla – Clyde Robert Bulla is quickly becoming one of my six-year-old son’s favorite authors.  We have enjoyed two other titles by him, and this one has us hooked already.  It is a short chapter book we are reading aloud together.  The story is about a young girl in the year 1609.  Her mother dies, and she determines to take her younger brother and sister across the ocean to where her father has built a home for them in America.

I recommend you hop on your library’s website now  – let the requesting begin!

Happy reading!

(In case you are curious, I am not affiliated with Amazon, and I do not receive any compensation for any purchases you might make through the above links.)

Read Full Post »

Cover of "A Child's Garden of Verses (Scr...

Cover via Amazon

Books are a huge part of our experience as a family and as homeschoolers.  I saw a wonderful quote this week over at One Hundred & 80 Days that says it almost perfectly –

“I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think interior decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves.” Anna Quindlen

It is only almost perfect since I do hope to pass on my interest in actual decorating to at least one of my girls. But, the point is, books are monumentally important around here.

Here are the treasures we are enjoying this week:

The Middle Moffat by Eleanor Estes

A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson

I, Columbus: My Journal 1492-3 Edited by Peter and Connie Roop

Amerigo Vespucci by Nina Brown Baker

Up and Down by Oliver Jeffers

All the Places to Love by Patricia MacLachlan

Read Full Post »

The children's author and illustrator, Jan Bre...

Image via Wikipedia

I cannot stress enough how much we love books around here.  Love, love, love books.  Great books have a wonderful way of working their way into your heart and weaving themselves into your life in a way unlike any other school lesson we could teach.

Finding great books is challenging.  We moms are busy, and leisurely browsing the shelves in any location – grocery store, thrift store, library – happens about as often as a weekend away with our husbands.  Not very often.

A charming classic fairy tale appropriate for very young listeners can actually be surprisingly difficult to find.  Original stories written by Hans Christian Anderson or the Grimm brothers are fantastic but quite often, well, a little morbid.  Which works well for older listeners (I’m talking probably 6 and up, if you think they can handle it.) who can be enthralled by the gore.  But for the younger ones (say, 3-5 years old) a beautifully illustrated retelling is the perfect way to get them hooked on traditional works.  (And by beautifully retold and illustrated, I don’t mean the book version of the Disney movie.  I didn’t need to say that, right?)

Jan Brett is an author and illustrator whose name you will want to write down somewhere.  She has retold several classic fairy and folk tales in a way that will keep the little ones attention with both the story and her lovely illustrations.  Simple, but certainly not twaddle.  And, as with any great book, it will captivate older listeners as well.  Mom included.

Beauty and the Beast is the latest Jan Brett fairy tale we have enjoyed.  Bring home and savor.

Read Full Post »